27 January 2014

My SYW FRENCH Cavalry – inclusive dragons et troupes légères à cheval

Here are my mounted French units.



Voilà. Mon corps d'élite de la Gendarmerie de France. The figures are really belonging to a series of WSS French cavalry, but their dress matches with that of around 1745, as well. Their motions are so fantastic, that I decided to make them my SYW Corps, despite objections from among odd purists. They are missing the turn-backs and come with a blackened demi-cuirasse or breast-plate worn on top the coat. Note the officer with his complete cuirasse with the first image. This unit is among my favourites - clearly. No doubt. The miniatures are by Ochel, Kiel.


Mestre-de-Camp-Général Cavalerie. Miniatures by Grünewald.


Du Roi Cavalerie. Miniatures are former Neckel, now available at Berliner Zinnfiguren. This is a particulary nice set of figures. I believe they are designed by Friedrich Schirmer.


Cuirassiers du Roi. (Grünewald)


Corps d'élite des Carabiniers. (Ochel, except for the officier who I chose to represent the gallant comte de Gisors himself at the head of his unit at the battle of Krefeld, 1758, the minute before he got shot dead.)


Bourbon Cavalerie. (Grünewald)


Conti Cavalerie. (Grünewald). I love this unit. Its odd plain grey uniform along with the paille housings make for very stylish looks. At times, less is more - colour-wise speaking. Also note the awesome motion of the kettle drums. The man sure will defend them with all possible determination.


Clermont Cavalerie. (Grünewald)


Fumel Cavalerie. (Grünewald). I guess the right position of the kettle drums would be found more centered, but the figure looks so nice that I had to place it in a more prominent position. He is by Ochel, Kiel.


Penthièvre Cavalerie. (Grünewald)


Royal Cravates and Fitzjames Cavalerie.
(Grünewald). I only found these two stands yesterday. They are from the collection of my late friend Dr. Ramb, that I inherited last year. I wasn't aware he also had two regiments of French cavalry. The stands are a bit crowded. About 18 figures to the base mesauring 10 by 10 cm. That's too much. 10 to 12 is just fine.

Orléans Dragons. (Ochel and Grünewald). They are among my first miniatures painted back in the 70's when I was a teenager.

Caraman Dragons. (formerly Neckel, now Berliner Zinnfiguren)

d'Apchon Dragons. (Grünewald) Collection Dr. Ramb.

Skirmishing mounted elements of the Volontaires de Clermont -Dragons, légères. (Ochel with converted hats à la Schomberg) The brazing and cutting business was quite an effort. Not sure if I would have the patience for all this today.


Now, literaly arriving at the lower end: voilà, the notorious brigands known as Chasseurs de Fischer, skirmishing, while awaiting the best moment to fall upon their opponents. (Ochel, Prussian hussars in summer dress with a converted Austrian trumpeter) Take hold of your wallet and other valuable belongings while looking at the image. They might steel it all. That's what they really after.

6 comments:

  1. Your cavalry has wonderful movement and animation to it.

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  2. Yes! These are absolutely stunning figures. Museum quality (no kidding).

    Best Regards,

    Stokes

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  3. Superb.

    I have some Fechner figures and perhaps I should try doing a base of figures. Out of interest do you base your infantry on 10 cm by 5 cm ?

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  4. Excellent work, Christian. I'm a bit curious, a few units here and there (such as Penthieve) look to be painted to a different standard. Are those groups you bought painted somewhere else, or has your painting style evolved over time ?

    Regards,
    Steve

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    1. You are right, the miniatures from Fred Ramb's collection he got mostly from e-bay, and have been painted by others. Also, you are looking at the paintwork from around 1982 up to today. My style of painting indeed evoled over the years. When I was a teenager, starting with painting flats, my figures looked very much like the Irish regiment Claire figures.

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  5. Just superb. The animation in these flats put most normal figures completely in the shade. Your painting from 1982 is better than mine now and that's after 35 years of alleged practice! What rules do you use for your battles?

    regards,
    Guy

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